Introduction: Two – Twins and opposites


“The previous post is on a first order arising after everything has fallen apart into an infinite number of particles. Your narrator has told the first steps towards a hierarchy and ethics. You have received a glimpse of heaven and hell. In this post we continue with twins and opposites.

Twins are very important to people. In ancient myths and stories twins are often at the beginning of important developments. But around these twins, there exists usually uncertainty and instability. A choice is foreseen. Unfortunately, in myths a violent decision is made. One of the twin children must leave or be killed.

You probably know the twins Romulus and Remus, who are raised by a wolf. Romulus killed Remus in a dispute over the sovereignty of the new city. After this assassination Romulus could continue the founding of Rome [1].

[2]

In Genesis – the first book of the Old Testament – Cain and Abel are the first two children of Adam and Eve. The description gives indications that they are twins. Cain was a farmer and Abel was a shepherd. Both brought offerings to God, but God accepted only the smoke from the cattle-sacrifice [3] [4] of Abel.

[6]

Because God does not accept the sacrifice of the harvest, Cain slew Abel – his brother [5].

People are very sensitive to opposites. In a desire for certainty, the opposition have to disappear as quickly as possible – often at the expense of a great loss. As a solution of this dilemma, one side of the opposites is then chosen. Your narrator showed you already the sad fate of Remus and Abel: the opposites within the twins have to be resolved by the disappearance of one child of the twins.

When opposites arise, people require clarification as quickly as possible. Much is put aside to get clarification between yes or no, right or wrong, true or false, belief or unbelief, right or wrong. Often this choice is made by an immediate sacrifice or destruction of one of the two opposites. This choice is so important for that people even commit fratricide; people are killed, war is made, people and dissidents are massacred.

Why should opposites immediately be solved? Why may they not survive? Has humanity a strong desire for oneness or is it necessary to settle unrest and discontent as quick as possible at the expense of great sacrifices? Or may be both? Is the lifting of the unrest and dissatisfaction worth committing major crimes? On their Odyssey, the main characters encounter many of these dilemmas.

Your narrator perceives in the distance the two main characters reappear. They are not twins and I hope that they will not solve their differences through violence and murder on their Odyssey. We’ll see.

Your narrator leaves the report now to the two main characters. In the next post, they will tell their story about a vigil at the beginning of spring in preparation for the next stage in their Odyssey.”


[1] See also: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romulus_en_Remus

[2] Source image: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bestand:Lupa_romana.jpeg

[3] See also: Mallory, J.P., In Search of the Indo-Europeans, p. 138

[4] See also: Introduction – Rituals 2 (27 maart 2011)

[5] See also: Genesis 4

[6] Source image: http://www.tstl.net/children/coloring/coloring.asp

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s