Introduction: Two – Separation of Earth and Air


As a farewell to the stage “One” on our Odyssey, you and I have seen the documentary “Powers of Ten “[1] twice. The first time we have enjoyed the images, the second time we have carefully examined the various manifestations of “Indra’s Net” at various sizes. The observations of “Indra’s Net” are always the same and always different.

We are approaching our second stage on our Odyssey.

First everything is completely one. Earth and sky, light and dark are inseparable: one and all. Prior to words and thoughts, oneness remains ever present. Unfortunately for you and me, this complete oneness is not comprehensible in thought and words: the complete oneness precedes our comprehension.

At a certain point, earth and air are separated [2]. Did this first separation occur in a sigh and quickly, or slowly and whispering, or in a big bang followed by a flash? We do not know.

[3]

This separation of earth and sky is the most painful split to date. Genesis in the Old Testament speaks of a rupture of heaven and earth. This separation created an all-encompassing gap where all the other may pass through. The following separations are vague recollections of the first rupture of earth and sky. Not that these later separations may not be painful, but this initial crack is the immense separation from which all other divisions have emerged like crackle.

[4]

During the “Separation of Earth and Air” and the subsequent divisions, you and I have completely disparted from the complete oneness. It is also the end of our perfect being together. As separate beings we continue our way on this Odyssey. But the desire for the complete oneness remains:

“I tend my flowers for thee – Bright Absenty” [5]

We reach the second stage of our Odyssey.


[1] See: http://www.powersof10.com/film

[2] See Genesis 1:1, Old Testament

[3] Source image: http://world.mongabay.com/dutch/travel/files/p5530p.html

[4] Source image: http://www.zoetglas.nl/veiligheidsglas.php

[5] See: Dickinson, Emily, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. London: Faber, 1977 – Poem 339

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s